Author Topic: Painting Embossed Letters  (Read 7598 times)

Anonymous

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Painting Embossed Letters
« on: September 23, 2005, 01:21:59 PM »
I have a Westinghouse WD-5 w/ embossed white lettering. The whole chest needs repainted and wonder if anyone has any advice on the cleanest way to do the White lettering. Some have said paint the red first then the white, white then the red. Someone also recommended hand painting it with One Shot lettering enamel. Any ideas on how to so this and make it look as clean as possible?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Anonymous »

Anonymous

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painting lettering
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2005, 11:46:47 PM »
Here you go, I ran across this forum accedently. I was heavy into restoration years ago and this was are little secret. Here is what I did with my machines with great success. I bought clear ordinary contact paper the stickey kind. Peeled it off and put it on the embossing hair dryer lightly, very lightly so it forms a little around edge. let sit for a second. Then take a DA sander with 80 grit. must be fresh. keep sander level and sand over the top. go slow......then throw some 180 grit and carefully smooth rough edges.then take some 1 shot with brush, paint it in. then while it's wet peel it off. and there you have it what a sign painter used to charge 75.00 for. practice and you will be surprised how good you will get. Good Luck
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Anonymous »

Anonymous

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update
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2005, 09:02:05 PM »
after about 10 coats of paint & primer, I forgot I had a frined who hand paints ceramics. She came over and four hours later, it looks almost as good as the chinese forgery (aka reproduction) cooler we have upstairs.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Anonymous »

irishmafia

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« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2006, 04:07:36 PM »
tried the contact paper trick ...worked ok for block lettering but not too well on the script...hard to get into smaller loops of script...like you said practice will help ...I will need more paint stripper !!!!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by irishmafia »

thouchins

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Painting Embossed Lettering
« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2007, 11:04:52 PM »
Here's a trick that works great for me that came out of Classic Auto Restorer magazine.
1) Spray just the embossed lettering first with WHITE LACQUER paint
2) Spray the cabinet with any Coca Cola RED ENAMEL paint.
NOTE: very important !  DO NOT get your Lacquer & Enamel paint mixed-up. Do it exactly like steps 1 & 2.
3) spray the WHITE LACQUER with at least two coats of paint and allow 20minutes between coats to dry. Then let the paint dry overnight.
4) spray the Coca Cola RED ENAMEL and let dry for 20minutes.
5) start removing the RED ENAMEL off the embossed letters using MINERAL SPRITS.
NOTE: MINERAL SPRITS effects only ENAMEL and not LACQUER paint. But the longer you let the red ENAMEL dry the harder it is to wipe it off.  I use old 100% cotton underware that no longer use to do my wipeing. I'll wrap the cotton material around my index finger and dip in the can of MINERAL SPRITS and start wipeing.

NOTE: so people like to use #360 & $600 sandpaper and do a wet sand instead of wiping the paint off with MINERAL SPRITS. Not me, I've had good luck using the cotton material & MINERAL SPRITS.

I use this method all the time when I'm restoring Coca-Cola Coolers. I just finished a small Airline Cooler and it looks great.
If you have any questions, you can email me.
Terry in Texas
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by thouchins »

jmsrvt

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« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2007, 06:55:40 PM »
To Houchans

In response to your suggestion, I understand about shooting the white laquer first then the red enamel. what I don't understand is the dry time you advised.

Laquer flashes off, then dries almost immediately, while enamel dries slowly unless a  hardener is added.

Unless I misread, your post says to let the laquer dry overnight, then shoot the enamel, let it flash for 20 minutes, then wipe off the embossing with mineral spirits.

My question is how do you avoid taking off the enamel you want to leave on the lower suface while removing it off the embossing since all the red paint is still wet after 20 minutes?

Thanks

Jmsrvt
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by jmsrvt »

thouchins

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Painting Embossed Lettering
« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2007, 07:48:49 PM »
Jmsrvt

1) Spray just the embossed lettering first with WHITE LACQUER paint. Let dry over night or 24 hrs.
2) Spray the whole cabinet with Coca Cola RED ENAMEL paint.  After about 20minutes, wipe the RED ENAMEL off the embossed letters using MINERAL SPRITS.  
This will show the WHITE letters and the MINERAL SPRITS will have no effect on the WHITE LACQUER letters.

Your question is:
"My question is how do you avoid taking off the enamel you want to leave on the lower suface while removing it off the embossing since all the red paint is still wet after 20 minutes? "

The answer is:
Spray the Coke machine 100% all over with GRAY PRIMER first. It does not matter if lacquer or enamel. Wait several days.
Then spray the WHITE LACQUER on the embossed letters only. Wait 24 hrs.
Spray the Coke machine 100% all over with Coca Cola RED ENAMEL. Wait 20 minutes.
Start wipeing the RED ENAMEL off the embossed letters. Only the WHITE will now show.

I can't explain it any simpliar then that.
Hope that answers your question.

Terry
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by thouchins »

vendo81

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« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2007, 12:56:49 AM »
I've restored many machines since 1986 and have tried every trick mentioned. They look good from a distance but up close their not nearly as good as a professional sign painter. You need to have a very steady hand to wipe off wet paint as it takes exact steadyness to get clean straight curves and lines. If your that talented you would be better off painting it after it's dry with a painters brush and the correct lettering paint. If a mistake is made you simply wipe it off and start over. With the wipe-off method, one slip of the hand or mistake and you would need to repaint or touch up the background color on the machine and it would never look right. I've seen hundreds of restored machines and I always notice bad lettering right off, especially if eye level like a 81. The best way in the long run is to get a good sign painter with one-shot paint to do the embossing. They can also do any other custom striping or lettering you may want. It will look perfect and unless you have a very steady hand or a custom stencil like the factories originally used the sign painter is the way to go.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by vendo81 »

3kross

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« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2008, 07:31:31 PM »
Does anybody know how they did it from the factory?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by 3kross »

gihuff

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Re: Painting Embossed Letters
« Reply #9 on: November 12, 2010, 05:16:19 PM »
I am going to try the One Shot red paint for the door on my CS-72. However which red closely matches the coke red of that era? The bright red or the fire red?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »

angitha

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Re: Painting Embossed Letters
« Reply #10 on: January 02, 2014, 11:23:19 PM »
i think u get good look .....
Courses question and answer 
« Last Edit: January 10, 2014, 04:57:24 AM by angitha »